index

Brad's Blog

  Click here to zoom down to today's entry (after clicking, you can bookmark this page and it should always take you to the current date).

March 6
   I've been pruning the fruit trees without a coat today--55 degrees.  Other years I've had to put plywood on the snow and been able to trim the tops of the trees on that platform...

I also transplanted some volunteer spinach that has wintered and some that just sprouted into our greenhouse.  We did have a long bed, but have replaced it with large plastic planters... I'm sure it was in the 80's in the greenhouse today...

March 10
We made it up to the ridge and saw the grass widows are coming on strong, along with buttercups and spring beauties...  I checked back to the blog March 2010 to find a comparable early flower bloom...  I was too busy finishing the fruit tree pruning to check the temperature today, but am sure it was in the 60's.

March 12
We made it over to Farragut State Park for a walk today--just saw two other people in the whole park...

There were some Buffleheads in Buttonhook Bay...

This horned grebe (nonmating plumage) was a new one for us...  That green is the real color of the water in
Lake Pend O'Reille.


It was a serious post card day, warm enough for shirt sleeves instead of coats...


On the way home, just shy of Athol, 6 elk were grazing right next to the road.  Butters got excited... 
So did we--elk aren't that common a sight for us, especially at 20 yards or less.

March 13
Another fine sunny day, so Butters and I hiked up the ridge to get some flower photos.  Here's this year's grass widow, currently very common...



 
March 17
We got 1 3/4 inches of rain over last weekend, and it's sprinkling again today.  No question about it being Spring around here...  I took Butters for a run in the drizzle and noticed these odd geese with a pair of Canada geese at the new Fireside Park:

I couldn't find them in a book so I suspect they're escaped barnyard fowl.  Someone on Facebook will correct me if I'm wrong...  Thanks to daughter-in-law Susa for identifying these as Muscovy ducks, which have indeed established a feral population up into Canada...

March 18
We went for a walk on Maiden Rock today, and except that the foreground will soon be a bit greener, got a nearly perfect shot uplake towards clouded Mt. Spokane with a pretty good dog as well...


This left (southern) side of the lake has only a few cabins, but there are a number of floating docks stored for winter safety along the shore above Butter's head...

March 22
     I went for another walk along the new bike trail at the end of the lake.  Being Just Spring, I noted the butterflies and heard frogs croaking...

But before leaving home I took a picture of one of the pine siskins that are still feeding at our sunflower seed feeder...






I don't know the name of the first, but this is a mourning cloak butterfly, and there were lots of them out...
This chipmunk was watching me eat my sandwich...
It was a several mile walk, and I saw tracks of moose or elk, and no people, even though it was a nice Sunday and I'd seen a half dozen vehicles from the local bike club at another entrance to the bike trail.

March 25
We got another half inch of cold rain the last couple days.  The lake is about a half foot from full pool.  The 40's days and 30's nights are keeping the spring flowers in suspension, but the grass is growing rapidly...
I finished recovering a dozen kitchen chairs, this time with cotton/rayon cloth and scotch guard.  Previously I'd used vinyl, but it cracked easily and suffered cat claws badly...

March 26
We walked along the lake facing side of the ridge today.  The first yellow bells are blooming:



The grass widows are at their height on the sunny side...  Unlike Ferdinand the Bull, I think Butters was smelling for rodents.
It was cold and rainy yesterday, cool and humid today...

March 30
Last weekend I went to a workshop by a potter from near Medical Lake, Washington--Jeff Harris.  He's been at it nearly as long as I have, but with a more artistic direction in his pots.
 
He brought lots of pots and slides to keep us well entertained, including this two part pot that he added a donut of clay to the top to make it larger.  I'd heard of adding coils of clay to large pots previously, but not a donut shape...  He demonstrated how he used wax resist in glazing as well...

On Sunday church was a bit more interesting than usual because on arrival we were told there was a funny hissing sound from the plumbing, which proved to be water pouring out of a pressure tank into the crawl space under the church.  Shutting off the power to the compressor finally subdued it until a plumber could check it out...   After church we walked around Kootenai Marsh, which is about a mile walk from the Priest Lake Visitor Center.  We walked along the side, trying to identify raptors and water fowl.

This wasn't a great photo but good enough to identify some ring necked ducks, which are pretty common in North America but new to us...


Here's the view of the whole marsh...  It's just barely Spring there, with a few patches of snow in the shady places and no Spring flowers yet...    We including Butters had a great time...



 
Books read and other media of note:
Robert Parker's The Bridge by Robert Knott.    Another good western in the tradition established by Robert Parker, an author like A.C. Doyle who's not allowed to die...  This is spoiler country, but if you don't accept a totally mystical explanation, seems likely an actress could play a passable gypsy...

Ancillary Justice by Ann Leckie. 
This reminds me of The Weapon Shops of Issher by AE Van Vogt, in that it has an entrenched imperial dynasty and guns seem to be the answer.  Otherwise it goes out of its way to not clue you in to the various alien concepts while keeping such familiar bits as captain and lieutenant, making it a mystery.  It is well written but slow moving, and did not make me long to read the sequel(s).

Guns of the Timberlands by Louis L'Amour
By this stage in his writing career, he was sensitive enough to environmental concerns to side with a cattleman against the timber men, at least on sensitive land.  L'Amour's women still don't seem to know how to do more than watch...  I'm listening to these while I work in the pottery, and they're entertaining but insipid.

David Thompson by Jack Nisbet 
Having toured through a good share of the Northwest, including a bit into Canada, this was fun reading for me,  and brought the historical surveyor and explorer to life...

Hondo by Louis L'Amour 
L'Amour's Old West was filled with beautiful single women running ranches on their own, and rugged handsome men who will fight off all the bad guys to get her.  That said, it's a fun fantasy...


Sondahl blog index
January
2017
February
2017










January
2016
February
2016
March
2016
April
2016
May
2016
January
2015
February
2015
March
2015
April
2015
May
2015
June
2015
July
2015
October
2015
December
2015
January
2014
February
2014
March
2014
April
2014
May
2014
June
2014
July
2014
October
2014
December
2014
January
2013
February
2013
March
2013
April
2013
May
2013
June
2013
July
2013
August
2013
September
2013
October
2013
November
2013
December
2013
January
2012
February
2012
March
2012
April
2012
May
2012
June
2012
July
2012
August
2012
September
2012
October
2012
November
2012
December
2012
January
2011
February
2011
March
2011
April
2011
May
2011
June
2011
July
2011
August
2011
September
2011
October
2011
November
2011
Deember
2011
January
2010
February
2010
March
2010
April
2010
May
2010
June
2010
July
2010
August
2010
September
2010
October
2010
November
2010
December
2010
January
2009
Febr.
2009
March
2009
April
2009
May
2009
June
2009
July
2009
August
2009
Sept.
2009
October
2009
November
2009
December
2009
Jan.
2008
Febr.
2008
March 2008
April
2008
May
2008
June
2008
July
2008
August
2008
September
2008
October
2008
November
2008
December
2008
Jan.
2007
Febr.
2007
March 2007April
2007
May
2007
June
2007
July
2007
August
2007
Sept.
2007
Oct.
2007
Nov.
2007
Dec.
2007
January 2006February 2006March 2006April 2006May 2006June 2006July 2006August 2006Sept. 2006Oct. 2006Nov. 2006Dec. 2006



April 2005May 2005 June 2005 July 2005August 2005September 2005October 2005November 2005December 2005
index