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Dec. 1, 2005

This is the view out the back door this morning, with a bit of sunlight before the current snowstorm arrived.  Snow makes life seem more precarious, particularly if you're travelling, but has its counterbalancing pleasures...
Today I spent too much time getting ready for our Clay Arts Guild sale on Saturday.  I had to put little tags with numbers and prices on about 120 pots I'm bringing to this fair.  I'm actually looking forward to the event, but I'm already thinking that next year the group should do it differently, assuming it's not such a bust that there is no next year.
There's also a sale I'm doing Sunday, but this one features 3 of my musical incarnations as well, so I think it will be fun.

Dec. 2
Another 8 inches of snow means the picture above, if taken today, would look similar, but the plant in the foreground is mostly buried.
It also meant a good deal of the day was spent shovelling snow.  It's good exercise when your health allows it.  Every season has its own agenda--winter's agenda is shovelling snow and keeping warm.  Also the ski mountain opened today, which makes life normal once again for our ski bum son...

Dec. 3

Suppose you threw a pottery sale and it went perfectly...  Well, there were of course glitches, but: This was all the Clay Art Guild 2nd annual pottery sale.
I went there with 5 boxes of pots, and returned with 2.  I'll find out how much the sales were later, as they were centrally controlled.
Even though I wasn't actively selling pots, I was performing on stage for 4 and a half hours, so I felt pretty wrung out at the end of the day...

Dec. 4
As I was driving into Spokane for the Domestic Violence Consortium's First Annual Holiday Sale, I thought briefly of a phrase I heard on public radio the other day.  The phrase was "Doing well by doing good," applied cynically to some politicians greasing their own palms while arranging contracts.   The phrase sprung to mind because I was heading in to this sale, which 15% of my sales would go to this worthy cause.
I don't know how the rival Wife Beater's Association Holiday Sale went, but for me this other one was a bust.
So instead of elaborating on the joys of "doing well by doing good," the topic today is, "How you do in life doesn't necessarily reflect on you personally."
The case in point is that yesterday, with the same number of pots and same display, in another questionable venue sale (2nd annual, but at a new location), I  (and most everyone else there) did very well indeed (without even pretending to do good), whereas if I were to judge my life by today's standard I would be considering a career change.
Indeed, an important, and never conclusively learned, art in choosing craft fairs to sell at  is learning which ones are worthwhile.
Back in May, I had a good experience with this same Domestic Violence group in a similar sale, so it's not necessarily even choosing the right venues.  I don't doubt that having temperatures outside suitable for ice cream storage had some effect, but the weather was the same yesterday.
At this point I should pass on some valuable insights on how to pick the winners, but considering my track record, I'll defer...
But, how you do in life doesn't necessarily reflect on you personally....

Dec. 5
I went skiing for the first time today.  It was cold and foggy, so the skiing was slow.  I fell about 3 times (mostly due to the fog and bad lighting), but only hard enough to feel a bit stiff now. Meanwhile my son Birrion is planning to ski daily through the season, and generally accomplishes what he plans...  He spent the afternoon hiking up above the Terrain Park feature called a wall, which you ski up to, up the side of, and then do something to avoid splatting when you come down.  I spent the afternoon napping, reading, and drawing out cartoons while waiting for him to finish...

Dec. 6
Today was the weekly jam again.  It was two fiddlers, Sam on guitar, and me on banjo, whistle, and harmonica.  The makeup of a jam determines the kind of music played. Fiddle tunes are called fiddle tunes because their strong musical line is well suited to fiddles.  A lot of fiddle tunes are difficult to pick on guitars, as each note (mostly) must be plucked individually on the guitar, while the bowing accommodates as many notes as can be fretted with the other hand.  So there is a secure common body of tunes like Red Wing, Little Beggar Man, Golden Slippers, and others that can be comfortably picked by fiddles and other instruments.  And those were the kind of tunes we played.

Dec. 7
I edited both the Folklore Society webpages and the Clay Art Guild webpages today.  I posted a lot more pictures from the sale last weekend at http://cagni.org/2005/holiday.html
Aside from that, I glazed two kiln loads today, and trimmed a lot of pots from yesterday.  As I worked on making some casseroles today, I decided they're the pots most likely to not make it through as first quality.  They have lids, which means lid fit problems, and handles and knobs, which can crack or fall off.  So I made 8 yesterday, and will try to remember to report how many make it through as 1st quality pots...

Dec. 8
I helped move stuff for the semiannual rearrangement of furniture today.  For this I'm pretty sure the safest course is to use your back and not your brain.  Men are genetically unsuited to arranging furniture, but lifting is a useful addendum to the program.
Later we had a lovely dinner out in Spokane with my inlaws, who may be reading this, so IT WAS WONDERFUL!

Dec. 9
    Approximately two days per week are spent throwing pots, the rest of the week dealing with the consequences... Today was a throwing day.  I made 24 serving bowls, around 25 1 lb. mugs, and 51 small 1/2 lb cups.  Being a bit bored, I checked my rate of manufacture for the cups--51 cups in 35 minutes, or about a cup and a half per minute.  Those hundred pots mostly filled up my ware shelves, which is part of the reason why I'm expanding my work studio in January, to about double the current size.  Besides shelf space, another usual bottleneck is the kilns, which must be fired one at a time to not strain our electrical system...  But the chief bottleneck is sales--I could produce more pots, but not without working harder to sell them, which would be more work than I'm willing to do.
    But speaking of sales, I got the sales figure from the sale last weekend--over $700, which is quite satisfactory.  The same email also listed the sales of the other members of our guild, and I was surprised to find some of them up to $2000 in sales. This brings me to the topic of competition.  While I was happy to have sold $700, it would have been nice to have sold $2000 (which was actually more money than the pots I brought along, so this is purely speculative.)  But I also felt bad for a couple of well qualified individuals who sold less than a hundred dollars.
    I do not have a fiercely competitive nature.  When I watch sports, I usually cheer for the underdog (which means my team generally loses).  It reminds me of a time in Holstein, Iowa, when we were there for a pastoral internship, and decided to go to the high school Homecoming football game.  I don't remember the details of the game, but the home team won, which left us feeling rosy as we were leaving the stadium.  That mood changed when we had to walk by the quarterback for the opposing team, who, in a contritional act kneeled in front of the school, dejected, like a  monumental sculpture (on the lines of Rodin's The Thinker, but in this case, The Loser).
So, yeah, I feel bad for losers.
So it was actually a relief to see that some of the amateur potters did better than me, because now I don't have to feel guilty for beating them out on sales.  But I think it's better next year not to know how everyone else did, because sales figures are too much like report cards...

Dec. 10
The house rearrangement got a lot closer to complete today, which leads me to reflect on the nature of memory.  Everything is in a different location, so there's the rational processes involved in figuring out where anything now is (based on remembering what happened to it in the move).  There are also the subconscious built in memories, such as where the garbage can is, which are harder to overcome, so I'll head to where the garbage can was before thinking consciously of where it went to.  I think most of us acquire a map in our heads of our surroundings which we can use to locate a lot of things without thinking.  I know if it's dark I can climb down from the loft I sleep in and walk to the bathroom without tripping over anything using my visual memory of the house layout.
This memory, though, can also be fooled, as we have several different bedrooms used on different occasions.  One night a couple years ago I was sleeping in the loft, but woke up to use the bathroom, and thought I was sleeping on the main floor. The result was I slipped over the side of the loft and fell 7 feet to the floor, partially landing on a chair, which both broke my fall and injured my ribs.
It will be a while before I do a lot of walking around in the dark in the new furniture arrangement...

Dec. 11
This was a busy musical day--several hours of jamming at the bluegrass association Christmas party, then singing a song for a local multichurch Christmas concert.  The song I sang was "The Virgin Mary had a Baby Boy," which I think I learned from my sister in the 60's, probably with her ukelele accompaniment, but the song goes back to someone like Harry Belafonte and probably to the West Indies before that.
It is a staple of Christmas choir music to try and do some black gospel hymns, and it usually fails (in my estimation), and probably would pall to others if they've seen a black gospel choir (which mostly don't rely on written music).
Anyway, my approach to music is folk/ear, with my one crutch the words (which drain from my brain like water through a sieve).  So I think with this song I was able to give a strong performance I think a solo can do that more easily than a choir, which has to sound good and balanced all together.  I had to leave the concert early as our son is flying home tonight, and the other family members are going to get him, leaving me to grannysit, so I didn't talk to anyone who heard it...

Dec. 12
Aside from glazing pots, I worked on new shelves for storing media in our living area--records, videos, CD's, and computer disks. Now just  books are on book shelves, and there's a central place with enough room to organize the slowly accumulated videos, computer programs, etc.  Increased organization is one way to defeat the slow entropy of daily life... Once you internalize the new locations for everything....

Dec. 13

Santa Lucia Day.  Last year my son and his girlfriend did the whole Santa Lucia gig--waking up everyone with a wreath of candles on her head and a cone on Star boy Forrest's head and serving buns in bed.  This year Susa's not here, so she phoned in her performance, but that still counts.
So I woke up this morning with a dream that I was sorting clothes and came across a woman's under blouse which had "Asgard" written  across the front.  This disturbed me enough to wake me up, since I couldn't quite remember the significance of Asgard, which I've since researched on the internet to remind others similarly mythologically challenged that Asgard is the home of the Norse Gods.  I was thinking Norse Heaven was Valhalla, but that's just the home for dead heroes and heroines..
So in honor of this event, I've made up the following Ole and Sven joke.  Context is everything, so wait until someone tells you of their dream of underclothes with Asgard written on them to try it...

Ole went out for a date with Brunhilde, and the next day Sven asked Ole how it went.
"Vell, I got as far as Asgard, den she socked me on the nose, and said if I tried that again, she'd help me to Valhalla."

Dec. 14
    On Dec. 7, I mentioned how I'd made some casseroles, and they've come out of the kiln a week later, with two of the eight as second quality pots.  That was about the percentage I'd expect, although for most of the pottery I make it's a much lower percentage of failures.  The problem with casseroles is doodads and lids.  There are 5 parts to a casserole, and whenever one piece is stuck onto or supposed to fit another, there's plenty of room for trouble.  One of the casseroles had a crack where the top knob was attached.  The other "second" casserole got a glob of stuff on it that fell off from the kiln shelf above it, which didn't have anything to do with its form, except wider items tend have a greater chance of getting gunked.  Both of them will still be sellable.  Teapots have a similar number of doodads--knobs, lugs, handles...  It's time to make them soon...  If I get too high a failure rate, I quit making them for a while, but eventually I forget how chancy they are and make another batch...
Customers sometimes ask what's the hardest pot to make.  None of the forms I make are intrinsically harder than any others, but the failure rate of some of them make them the hardest to pull together successfully.

Dec. 15
    I made pfefferneusse today, one of my favorite cookies (recipe on my cooking page).  Although it's a favorite cookie, I've self imposed a rule to only make them during Advent/Christmas, to keep them a holiday tradition. This is probably also good for my waistline, as the recipe makes about 500 cookies, and I tend to eat about 100 of them myself.
While making them I reflected on holiday traditions.  We don't have a lot of Christmas traditions in our family.  We do have Advent devotions, reading a series of Bible verses I picked out years ago which are key verses leading in Christian thought towards the birth of Jesus.
    When I was growing up, we had a typical, mostly secular, Christmas, with the best part being the showing of 8 mm family movies on Christmas Eve.  Some of my brother's friends would show up, and everyone would make wise cracks about the films, with topics including airplanes taking off and landing, and the ski jump at Lake Louise.  The nice thing about 8 mm movies is that they were 2 minutes or less in length, and expensive to produce, so no one could die of boredom (which can happen with home videos) while watching them.  With rewinding and threading, more time was spent between movies than watching them, allowing for plenty of socializing.
In my wife's minister family, going to lots of church services was the norm, plus trying to prepare a Swedish Christmas dinner, which I might remember to describe around Christmas, as we do it in parts...

Dec. 16
    We've got these really cool miniature robots that detect spills and mop them up.
    Well, actually we've got these tiny ants, and any time we leave anything sweet around, they make an antline to it, and eventually clean it up, so I suppose that's as good as miniature robots, but, like most of you, I go, "ANTS!  Lousy little beings!"  I think, back at the beginning of my blog career, I reflected that we used to have big wood ants who nested in our walls and came out mostly in the Spring and never bit us, but occasionally filled the windows with their winged youth.  Then for some reason the colony moved out, and since then, only when it's too cool outside, we've got these miniature sweet ants.  They don't bite either, but they tickle if they end up on you.
The reason the subject is ants, is that after making the pfefferneusse last night, I washed out the measuring cup and put it in the dish drainer.  This morning there was an antline leading to the drainer, and a bit of light detective work revealed I hadn't washed out the cup well enough, of the honey that had gone into the dough.
    So in spite of the ants not being the ideal robot housecleaners, they do a nice job of quality control on the sweet cleanups...
    Then my son Forrest was showing me some computer programs that make little turtles simulate natural systems by giving them simple programs.  One example was how they could simulate with random activity and scent trails the food gathering system of ants.
    I agreed that the program was doing that, but it's much harder to explain with a simple algorhythm how their relatives the Monarch butterflies all migrate to the same area in Mexico every winter, with brains the size of a pinhead.  There's even another kind of butterfly that migrates in stages, taking several generations to complete the annual migration.  Science approaches understanding of the natural world, but only through models. Inevitably some mystery remains...

Dec. 17
 We're getting close to the end of remodeling the pottery house, although adding a large outdoor show area will wait till next Spring.  Currently we've spent less than $50 on the remodel, which is probably significantly less than most people associate with a remodel. So far we've added bookshelves, media shelves, shelves for musical instruments, and new cupboards in the kitchen.  Most of these shelves were made with wood we're recycling from other projects.  Other wood has been scavenged.  We got some hollow-core bifold doors in Minnesota the last time we were out there, that have been remade into kitchen cupboards.  Some of the support boards for it were molding scraps someone had dumped along a path leading down to Spirit Lake.
   So I thought we were doing well on this project, when my wife mentioned a granite countertop would be the best top for some recycled drawers we were installing in the kitchen.  Unfortunately, I think she's right.  We've already got one granite countertop, and since pottery is sort of artificial rock making, granite really appeals to me.  Fortunately I can probably get some credit for upcoming Christmas and anniversary celebrations by conceding on this point. After all, the last one was purchased under the same circumstances, at about this time of year a couple years ago...  Besides, the only wood we've got left at this point is needed for the cupboard doors...

Dec. 18

About the only thing I know about Bauhaus design was that I heard once that students had to design a building by cutting a single piece of paper, and they must use all the pieces to make the design.  I thought that was clever, so I've remembered it (although for all I know I've got it all wrong).
Anyway, the kitchen cupboard mentioned yesterday has turned into a Bauhaus project, as my wife suggested using the leftover bifold doors to make the doors of the cupboard as well. So I ended up using almost all of both the molding and the bifold doors, and finished the project just now.  This is the view of our kitchen with the new cupboards at upper center,  old drawers with new firewood storage and new location, and pottery showroom at the right.
We're still likely to go with the granite countertop...
 

Dec. 19. Two kilnloads glazed today, a couple late orders for Christmas.  My spare time was spent working on redesign of my webpages menus, result to appear soon.

Dec 21.  I'm overhauling all my webpages, so things are a bit mixed up at present.  It should be sorted out in a day or two...

Dec. 22  Hopefully the website is in good shape again.
I spent the afternoon going over music with a talented multi-instrumentalist that I invited to join the Sondahl Hawkins duo for a bluegrass concert in February.  It was fun, but a bit stressful, as I view him as a superior musician, so I was always a bit nervous.  At times though, we really meshed in a way that I wish had been recorded...  Both of the groups I play in are looking to record new CD's, which may help get us through the post Christmas blahs.
Speaking of blahs, it's been raining a lot today, melting the snow in these lower elevations, and challenging the ski areas to keep open, although some snow was reported there today by my daily skiing son.  It was a bad combination when the storm that broke up a month of dry cold brought warm wet rather than more snow, as is typical of this time of year...
On the Christmas countdown, we still don't have a tree, which is about par for us, trying to live Christmas on the liturgical instead of commercial calendar.  We're surrounded by evergreens, so it's not a real problem getting one, but the way is not yet clear to this year's tree.  Also I'm currently making fruit soup--canned, dried, and fresh fruit cooked till soft, a traditional wife's family food.  I got some potato sausage at the local grocery, one of those foods that used to be eaten by pioneers stretching their sausage with potato, I assume, like lutefisk--reconstituted cod.  It's better than lutefisk, anyway.

Dec.23
I heard from two blog readers today, first from Linda Lander in Australia:
As usual our weather is the exact opposite of yours. Yesterday was summer solstice. Its been really hot the last few days. it was 40 degrees celcius but I don't really complain  when its hot. I live about 3 1/2 hrs drive from the snow here in winter and a 1/2 hour here is about enough for me, then I want to be warm again.  I can't imagine the amount of snow shown in your picture, it would never happen in Australia.

I don't anticipate visiting Australia, and sometimes think some of the stuff I show on the blog is mundane, so I appreciate that someone enjoys my different locale, and I enjoy hearing about hers as well.

May Luk in London wrote:
Those potato sausages - it reminds me of my grandma back in Hong Kong. During the war, (as the Chinese saying goes; 'when the Japanese came', which stands for the war) there wasn't enough rice, so the rice was cooked with yam or taro, a purple cousin of the potato. They could be dug everywhere. It's actually more nutrious (and tastier) than plain rice, but they didn't know that. Rice was everything. My grandma was still cooking that way after the war. And I also make that sometimes because that's what I grew up in, even though it was war time food.
I reckon the potato sausage is probably better than whole meat sausage, nutritionally speaking.

May's comment reminded me that my mother would at times fix Philadelphia Scrapple for my father (none of us kids liked it).  As I recall, it's corn mush with bacon fat mixed in, sliced in lumps and fried.  I don't think it would win any nutritional contests, but when calories are what's needed, it works.  I learned from my parents that during the Great Depression my father ate a lot of corn mush. His father had died when he was young, and his mother struggled raising 4 boys in Sioux Falls, South Dakota.  During the Depression, commodity prices bottomed out like many other things, so that a bushel of corn could be bought for pennies.  Sometimes corn mush was all they could afford...
The whole generation which lived through the Depression was inspired not to repeat those dire times, and their intripid will resulted in the great wealth of the last half of the 20th Century for much of the world.
Of course greed always serves as sufficient "carrot" to drive capitalism, but the generations in business today have never known the kind of want which propelled that generation to succeed through World War II and beyond...

Dec. 24
So we're waiting for the Turkey button to pop.
I asked my mother why she started serving Matzoh ball soup on Christmas Eve.  She said it was because she wanted to be ecumenical.
I said I guessed that was in part because she was strongly against religious discrimination, having experienced it herself when she first moved to the Twin Cities during World War II, and her last name, Rosenwald, made some people think she was Jewish.  (Actually, being German, she might have met with some discrimination on that count as well, but German ancestry is common in Minnesota).

Back to our own traditional Christmas dinner.  My wife's clergy family would not only have a bunch of services on Christmas Eve, but prepare all this Swedish food for the Christmas Dinner, which inevitably would result in her mother freaking out and chewing on her knuckles as the gravy burned...  As I first experienced it, it included the fruit soup, potato sausage, boiled potatoes, lutefisk, Crem (another fruity pudding), Swedish Tea Ring, and rice pudding.  Rice pudding had special prizes hidden in it, with portentous meanings-- like a ring (next to marry), a nut (smart), and a silver coin (rich).  I think there also would be ham or turkey as well.
Having no desire or need to stuff ourselves, we now spread the traditional foods out through the Christmas season.  Tonight's supper includes turkey, Swedish tea ring, fruit soup, apple sauce, cooked carrots and broccoli.  The pffefferneusse are gone, so I made some Oatmeal nobake cookies, which aren't traditional Christmas cookies for us, but a family favorite.
After supper we plan to decorate our Christmas tree and go to an 11 pm candlelight service 50 miles away in Spokane...
May you feel good about whatever you're supposed to be celebrating.

Dec. 25
I won't go into details as to our Christmas felicitations, except to note that now computers outnumber humans in this family by a ratio of 1.5 to 1.  It's also the year we got more phone lines (cell + land) than family members, although that had nothing to do with Christmas.  Neither of these I would have thought probable 20 years ago.  Our supper this evening quickly lapsed into the eclectic realm, as traditional Christmas requirements merged with the need to push leftovers.  So we had the potato sausage (two of the four of us, anyway), Swedish meatballs (actually just beef meatballs, no pork sausage mixed in, due to son's preference), with leftover spaghetti, and rice because rice is needed to make rice pudding.  This meal could be a paradigm of the modern life, a free adaptation of cultures and lifestyles...

Dec. 26
Because of the blah rainy overcast weather, there was nothing better to do today than work, so I glazed a couple kiln loads of pots and threw about a kiln's worth on the wheel as well.  Of the two kiln loads, only two large tankards were orders, so of course I poked through the side with my glazing tongs on one of them.  Fortunately, when I took the order, neither of us mentioned Christmas as a deadline...
Some of the pots I made today are for a wholesale dinnerware order due next spring.  This order has got me wondering how much wholesaling I (or other potters) can really afford to do.  If I priced my pottery at gallery prices it wouldn't be a big deal, since those prices imply someone else is getting around 50% of the selling price.  My prices are mostly based on getting a good return when I sell them directly to the customer, with no sales commissions involved.  So when I sell at wholesale (half my usual prices), the work-time and materials expenses make it much less profitable.
Aside from the price issue, the other issue is that while factories just keep their machines rolling longer to make the widget, craftspeople have to make every widget, so there's no advantage to doing a larger order.  The 500th mug takes exactly as much work as the 5th mug, so there's no setup or labor savings in doing large orders.
The only plus is that you do get some income you wouldn't otherwise.  This brings us back to the dinnerset.  Although I'm going to work several weeks to make the set (actually making a lot of other pots at the same time, but my kilns won't fire 36 plates at a time...), the sales outlet will get half of the total  price for several minutes of work.  On the surface, this seems patently unfair, but as a seller I know the overhead costs of making sales that justify them earning their percentage.   But it still seems patently unfair...  Fortunately I don't do a lot of wholesale business, or else I'd have to actually do something about this instead of grousing about it here...

Dec. 27
The weather returned to good wholesome snow (well, sleet actually, but we have to take what we can get, this year--some years there's 5 feet of snow on the ground here).  I unloaded a nice glaze kiln, and fired another.  That kiln is either taking too long, or I forgot to set the timer for a sufficient time, because it shut off without finishing, meaning I had to restart it after it had cooled significantly.  I'll know tomorrow if it's kiln troubles or brain troubles.
I was back to manufacturing pottery DVD's today, as there's been a new flurry of interest in them in December (Tom said frostily :-)).
My son Forrest glazed the pots yesterday which he made as part of a new beginner's video, so hopefully I'll assemble that video in the next month or so.  A beginner's video is actually pretty daunting for me, as there's so much I think is important for beginners to know, that I can't remember to tell it all on camera...  For the intermediate one, anything I forgot I can tell myself, "Well, they should have known that already...."

Dec. 28
The kiln problem was brain related yesterday--forgetting to put enough time on the timer.  It's sort of like feeding a parking meter--it's an extra shutoff for the kiln based on time instead of temperature.
Otherwise today was sleety again, and after-Christmas-blah.  This is not the weather that kicks northerners out of their winter depression sufficiently by invoking the survival cortex--"shovel snow or be trapped," for instance, or "chop wood or freeze."
The Christmas turkey is now turkey noodle soup.  A late addition to the traditional Swedish Christmas meal got ordered today--lingonberry preserves, from a family farm near where Althea grew up in Western Washington.  We haven't had them for many years.  But leftovers are controlling the menu these days.

Dec. 30
Things are getting complicated again--today is our 28th anniversary, our son is leaving to return to grad school tomorrow, and my wife's lifelong friend is here for a visit, with another friend visiting tomorrow.  Throw in the funeral of another close friend of my wife tomorrow, and it's easy to see there's a lot of energy around.  So we celebrated our anniversary taking our son and the friend out to lunch. Then I made a second batch of pffefferneusse, to send some to Chicago with my son.  I'm still doing some pottery in the idle minutes.
Winter also has made a special guest appearance, with a couple inches on the ground, and unknown quantities expected overnight, with unknown effects on flights out of Spokane, leaving at 7 am...


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